Learn How to Add Text to an Image in Python – 4 Easy Steps

Step 1: Install the Pillow library

We need the Pillow library in order to manipulate images. It can be installed by using pip.

pip install Pillow

This enables us to use PIL (Python Imaging Library) library.

Step 2: Download a font to use.

You can browse fonts free to download from Google Font Library. In this example I use the Balsamic Sans.

Place the download in the same folder as you want to work from.

Step 3: Find an awesome picture

I use Pexels to find free awesome pictures to use.

And place that image in your same location.

Step 4: Create you Python program to add your awesome text

from PIL import Image, ImageDraw, ImageFont

# Open the image (change name and location if needed)
image = Image.open('pics/background.jpg')
draw = ImageDraw.Draw(image)

# Import the font(change name and location if needed, also change font size if needed)
font = ImageFont.truetype('font/BalsamiqSans-Bold.ttf', size=200)
black = 'rgb(0, 0, 0)'  # black color

# Draw the text - change position if needed
message = "This is great!"
draw.text((1000, 200), message, fill=black, font=font)

# Draw the text - change position if needed
name = 'You are AWESOME!'
draw.text((1100, 500), name, fill=black, font=font)

image.save('greeting_card.png')

What is a Substitution Cipher and is it Secure?

What will you learn?

  • What is a Substitution Cipher?
  • How to implement the Substitution Cipher in Python
  • Understand the key space of Substitution Cipher
  • The weakness and how to break the Substitution Cipher

What is a Substitution Cipher

Imagine you receive this message: IQL WPV WCVJQEV

What does it mean?

You were told it is a Substitution Cipher, but how will that help you?

First of all, we need to understand what a Substitution Cipher is. Basically, it is just rearranging the characters. That is every time you write an A, you exchange that with, say, Q. And B with G. C with, hey, let’s keep the C.

See the mapping in the picture below.

Substitution Cipher Example

That seems pretty solid. Right?

But can we figure out what your message means?

First, let’s try to implement a Substitution Cipher.

Implementing Substitution Cipher in Python

We will use the random library to generate random keys. We’ll get back to how many keys are there.

import random


def generate_key():
    alphabet = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
    chars = list(alphabet)
    key = {}
    for c in alphabet:
        key[c] = chars.pop(random.randint(0, len(chars) - 1))
    return key


def print_key(key):
    for c in "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ":
        print(c, key[c])


def encrypt(key, message):
    cipher = ""
    for c in message:
        if c in key:
            cipher += key[c]
        else:
            cipher += " "
    return cipher


def get_decrypt_key(key):
    dkey = {}
    for k in key:
        dkey[key[k]] = k
    return dkey


key = generate_key()
print(key)
cipher = encrypt(key, "YOU ARE AWESOME")
print(cipher)
dkey = get_decrypt_key(key)
message = encrypt(dkey, cipher)
print(message)

Well, let’s understand the key-space. How secure is the Substitution Cipher?

The key-space of the Substitution Cipher

Let’s examine how the keys are generated.

Substitution Cipher with key-space calculation

The first letter, A, can be mapped to 26 possibilities (including A itself). The next letter, B, can be mapped to 25 possibilities. The third letter, C, can be mapped to (difficult to guess) 24 possibilities. And so forth.

This generates a space of (read the large number in the picture above). That is right. It is more than 88 bits of security.

That is a lot.

88 bits of security? That is you need to try (more than) 309485009821345068724781056 possibilities.

A whole lot. And that, I promise you, should be considered secure.

But wait, Substitution Cipher is not used any more, why? Read on, and you will know in a moment.

The weakness of Substitution Cipher

If the underlying language is English, then you can make a simple frequency analysis of how often the letters occur on average in English.

It turns out to be quite simple.

letter_freq = {'a': 0.0817, 'b': 0.0150, 'c': 0.0278, 'd': 0.0425, 'e': 0.1270, 'f': 0.0223,
               'g': 0.0202, 'h': 0.0609, 'i': 0.0697, 'j': 0.0015, 'k': 0.0077, 'l': 0.0403,
               'm': 0.0241, 'n': 0.0675, 'o': 0.0751, 'p': 0.0193, 'q': 0.0010, 'r': 0.0599,
               's': 0.0633, 't': 0.0906, 'u': 0.0276, 'v': 0.0098, 'w': 0.0236, 'x': 0.0015,
               'y': 0.0197, 'z': 0.0007}

That is, the letter ‘a’ occurs 8.17% percent probability. ‘b’ with 1.5%. ‘c’ with 2.78%.

Hence, given the text: IQL WPV WCVJQEV

Well, we are out of luck, because it is too short to have any frequency analysis to have any significance.

But the following text.

lrvmnir bpr sumvbwvr jx bpr lmiwv yjeryrkbi jx qmbm wi
bpr xjvni mkd ymibrut jx irhx wi bpr riirkvr jx
ymbinlmtmipw utn qmumbr dj w ipmhh but bj rhnvwdmbr bpr
yjeryrkbi jx bpr qmbm mvvjudwko bj yt wkbrusurbmbwjk
lmird jk xjubt trmui jx ibndt
  wb wi kjb mk rmit bmiq bj rashmwk rmvp yjeryrkb mkd wbi
iwokwxwvmkvr mkd ijyr ynib urymwk nkrashmwkrd bj ower m
vjyshrbr rashmkmbwjk jkr cjnhd pmer bj lr fnmhwxwrd mkd
wkiswurd bj invp mk rabrkb bpmb pr vjnhd urmvp bpr ibmbr
jx rkhwopbrkrd ywkd vmsmlhr jx urvjokwgwko ijnkdhrii
ijnkd mkd ipmsrhrii ipmsr w dj kjb drry ytirhx bpr xwkmh
mnbpjuwbt lnb yt rasruwrkvr cwbp qmbm pmi hrxb kj djnlb
bpmb bpr xjhhjcwko wi bpr sujsru msshwvmbwjk mkd
wkbrusurbmbwjk w jxxru yt bprjuwri wk bpr pjsr bpmb bpr
riirkvr jx jqwkmcmk qmumbr cwhh urymwk wkbmvb

This has enough letters to make an analysis of the letters. Let’s try.

cipher = """lrvmnir bpr sumvbwvr jx bpr lmiwv yjeryrkbi jx qmbm wi
bpr xjvni mkd ymibrut jx irhx wi bpr riirkvr jx
ymbinlmtmipw utn qmumbr dj w ipmhh but bj rhnvwdmbr bpr
yjeryrkbi jx bpr qmbm mvvjudwko bj yt wkbrusurbmbwjk
lmird jk xjubt trmui jx ibndt
  wb wi kjb mk rmit bmiq bj rashmwk rmvp yjeryrkb mkd wbi
iwokwxwvmkvr mkd ijyr ynib urymwk nkrashmwkrd bj ower m
vjyshrbr rashmkmbwjk jkr cjnhd pmer bj lr fnmhwxwrd mkd
wkiswurd bj invp mk rabrkb bpmb pr vjnhd urmvp bpr ibmbr
jx rkhwopbrkrd ywkd vmsmlhr jx urvjokwgwko ijnkdhrii
ijnkd mkd ipmsrhrii ipmsr w dj kjb drry ytirhx bpr xwkmh
mnbpjuwbt lnb yt rasruwrkvr cwbp qmbm pmi hrxb kj djnlb
bpmb bpr xjhhjcwko wi bpr sujsru msshwvmbwjk mkd
wkbrusurbmbwjk w jxxru yt bprjuwri wk bpr pjsr bpmb bpr
riirkvr jx jqwkmcmk qmumbr cwhh urymwk wkbmvb"""

alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
freq = {}
for c in alphabet:
    freq[c] = 0

cnt = 0
for c in cipher:
    if c in alphabet:
        freq[c] += 1
        cnt += 1

for c in freq:
    freq[c] = round(freq[c]/cnt, 4)

print(freq)

Will give you the following output.

{'a': 0.0077, 'b': 0.1053, 'c': 0.0077, 'd': 0.0356, 'e': 0.0077, 'f': 0.0015, 'g': 0.0015, 'h': 0.0356, 'i': 0.0635, 'j': 0.0743, 'k': 0.0759, 'l': 0.0124, 'm': 0.096, 'n': 0.0263, 'o': 0.0108, 'p': 0.0464, 'q': 0.0108, 'r': 0.13, 's': 0.0263, 't': 0.0201, 'u': 0.0372, 'v': 0.0341, 'w': 0.0728, 'x': 0.031, 'y': 0.0294, 'z': 0.0}

This gives you some hints on how the letters are mapped.

Exit mobile version